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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 28 October 2019
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Black Cottonwood (Populus balsamifera ssp. trichocarpa)/Balsam Poplar (Populus balsamifera ssp. balsamifera)

BLACK COTTONWOOD (Populus balsamifera ssp. trichocarpa)

BALSAM POPLAR (Populus balsamifera ssp. balsamifera)

These hardy, straight-trunked deciduous trees have large, sticky, fragrant buds. On the coast, black cottonwoods can reach 50 metres tall, but balsam poplars usually reach only 25 metres.

LEAVES

Shiny, dark green leaves are 6 to 12 centimetres long, pale underneath and often marked with brown. They vary from oval to wedge-shaped and have a sharply pointed tip.

FLOWERS

Male and female catkins are on separate trees. Male catkins are small, 2 to 3 centimetres long and female catkins are larger, 8 to 20 centinletres long.

FRUIT

The hairy capsules open to release seeds which are covered with white, fluffy hairs.

BARK

The bark is smooth, yellowish-g…

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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 28 October 2019
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Paper Birch (Betula papyrifera)

PAPER BIRCH (Betula papyrifera)

A small to medium-sized tree, often with many stems, up to 30 metres tall. In forests, it has a slender trunk that often curves before extending to the narrow, oval-shaped crown. In the open, the crown is pyramid-shaped.

LEAVES

Triangle- or egg-shaped, about 8 centimetres long, and doubly toothed; dull green on top, paler with a soft down underneath.

FLOWERS

The flowers are either male or female and are in narrow catkins. Female catkins are 2 to 4 centimetres long, standing erect at the tip of the branch. Male catkins are longer and hang below the branch. The flowers appear before or at the same tinle as the leaves.

FRUIT

The nutlets have wings broader than the seed. Each tree produces thousands of seeds.

BARK

Thin, w…

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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 28 October 2019
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Red Alder (Alnus rubra)

RED ALDER (Alnus rubra)

A medium-sized broad-leaf tree, up to 24 metres tall. Trees growing in the forest develop a slightly tapered tnmk extending up to a narrow, rounded crown. Trees in the open have crowns that start near the ground giving it a broad cone shape.

LEAVES

Bright green above and greyish underneath. They are oval-shaped, with pointed tips, and coarsely toothed edges that tend to curl under. The hair-covered veins form a ladder-like pattern. Leaves stay green until they drop off.

FLOWERS

The flowers occur as either male or female clusters. Male flowers are in long, drooping, reddish catkins, and female flowers are in short, woody, brown cones.

FRUIT

The female cones are oval-shaped, 2 centimetres long. The seed is a narrow winged nut…

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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 28 October 2019
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Garry Oak (Quercus garryana)

GARRY OAK (Quercus garryana)

An attractive deciduous tree with thick, grooved, scaly, greyish-black bark and a round spreading crown; grows up to 20 metres tall.

LEAVES

Deeply lobed leaves are bright green and glossy above and paler with red to yellow hairs underneath. The leaves turn brown in the fall. Leaves often have bumps caused by gall wasps.

FRUIT

Acorns are small in size with a shallow scaly cup on one end.

BARK

Greyish-black bark with thick grooves and scales.

GARRY OAK ON THE MAP OF B.C

It grows in southeastern Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands, with some isolated groups of trees in the lower Fraser Valley.

HABITAT

Garry oak forms open parkland and meadows that are scattered with Douglas-fir and a lush spring display of herbs - camas, Ea…

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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 28 October 2019
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Cascara (Rhamnus purshiana)

CASCARA (Rhamnus purshiana)

A small deciduous tree or shrub with greyish-black bark that grows to 10 metres tall.

LEAVES

Alternate, oblong leaves have fme teeth along their edges and prominent veins running parallel to the sides. It is the only deciduous tree in the province whose buds are not covered by bud scales in the winter.

FLOWERS

Nondescript, greenish flowers, clustered near ends of branches.

FRUIT

Purplish-black berries.

BARK

Thin, dark greyish-brown; smooth when young, becomes scaly with age. A cut in the bark reveals a bright yellow inner bark that turns dark brown on exposure to air and light.

CASCARA ON THE MAP OF B.C

It is found on the southern part of the coast and Vancouver Island and in scattered locations in the Columbia Valley in th…

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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 28 October 2019
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Arbutus (Arbutus menziesii)

ARBUTUS (Arbutus menziesii)

A deciduous broadleaf evergreen tree, up to 30 metres tall, usually with a crooked or leaning trunk that divides into several twisting upright branches and an irregularly rounded crown.

LEAVES

Dark and glossy but pale underneath, 7 to 12 centimetres long, thick, with a leathery texture.

FLOWERS

Dense clusters of urn-shaped white, waxy flowers drooping at the ends of twigs in April or May.

FRUIT

The fruit is berry-like, 7 millimetres across, and bright reddish-orange, with a peel-like surface texture.

BARK

The bark is thin, smooth, and reddish-brown, peeling in thin flakes or strips to expose younger, smooth, greenish to cinnamon-red bark underneath.

ARBUTUS ON THE MAP OF B.C

Arbutus is restricted to a narrow band along the …

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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 28 October 2019
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Vine Maple (Acer circinatum)

VINE MAPLE (Acer circinatum)

A deciduous shrub or small tree, sometimes reaching a height of 20 metres; it has a short, crooked trunk, with twisted, spreading limbs and a low, irregularly shaped crown. The trunk sometimes grows almost horizontally and may root if it touches the ground. Vine maple can become a sprawling shrub that grows into dense thickets.

LEAVES

Leaves are almost circular, 6 to 11 centimetres in diameter, with 7 to 9 lobes; the lobes are triangular, with sharp single or double teeth; bright yellowish-green on top, pale green and downy underneath, turning red or yellow in autumn.

FRUIT

The fruit consists of winged seeds, 2 to 4 centimetres long, joined in pairs and borne in a cluster; the wings of the seeds are spread widely.

BAR…

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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 28 October 2019
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Douglas Maple (Acer glabrum)

DOUGLAS MAPLE (Acer glabrum)

A shrub to small deciduous tree, 1 to 7 metres in height; the trunk may be divided into a few slender limbs. These are further divided into many small branches to form an irregular and even-topped crown.

LEAVES

Leaves are 7 to 10 centimetres wide, divided into 3 to 5 lobes, and have a typical maple-leaf shape. They are coarsely toothed, dark green on top and greyish-green underneath, turning bright red-orange in autumn.

FRUIT

The fruit consists of a cluster of winged seeds, joined in pairs at a sharp angle in a V-shape. The seed wings are about 2.5 centimetres long, and the seeds are strongly wrinkled and indented.

BARK

Generally thin, smooth, and dark reddish-brown; roughened on larger branches and old trunks.

DOUGLAS …

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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 28 October 2019
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Bigleaf Maple (Acer macraphyllum)

BIGLEAF MAPLE (Acer macraphyllum)

The largest maple in Canada, reaching heights of 36 metres. When it grows in the forest, it develops a narrow crown that is supported by a stem free of branches for half its length. Those growing in the open have a broad crown which is supported by a few large, spreading limbs.

LEAVES

Leaves are deeply five-lobed and are the largest of any maple in Canada, measuring 15 to 30 centimetres across. They have only a few bluntish, wavy teeth; are shiny, dark green on top and paler underneath; and turn yellow in the fall. The leaf stalk sometimes oozes a milky substance when it is broken. Twigs and leaves emerge as pairs.

FLOWERS

Small greenish-yellow flowers, about 3 millimetres across, appear early in spring, hanging…

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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 28 October 2019
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Pacific Dogwood (Comus nuttollii)

PACIFIC DOGWOOD (Comus nuttollii)

A small deciduous tree or shrub, up to 15 metres tall, with branches arranged in a circular pattern around the tree.

LEAVES

Opposite, oval leaves have pointed tips and a slightly toothed edge. Pacific dogwood leaves are dark green and turn orange in fall, like most deciduous trees.

FLOWERS

The showy, white flowers are actually four to six modified leaves that surround a cluster of 30 to 40 small, green flowers. Dogwoods usually flower in spring and again in fall.

FRUIT

The dark red berries are edible but bitter.

BARK

Smooth and grey.

PACIFIC DOGWOOD ON THE MAP OF B.C

It grows on the southern coast and on Vancouver Island south of Port Hardy.

HABITAT

Pacific dogwood grows best on deep, coarse, well-drained soils, often …

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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 28 October 2019
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Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii)

DOUGLAS FIR (Pseudotsuga menziesi)

A large coniferous tree, reaching heights of 85 metres on the coast and 42 metres in the Interior. Older trees have a long, branch-free trunk and a short cylindrical crown with a flattened top. There are two varieties of Douglas-ftr - coastal and Interior.

LEAVES

Needles are flat with a pointed tip. The upper surface is bright yellowish-green with a single groove down the centre; the lower surface is paler. The needles appear to stand out around the twig.

CONES

Cones are 5 to 11 centinletres long, turning from green to grey as they mature. Between each scale, long three-pronged bracts are easily seen. Seeds are winged at the tip.

BARK

Smooth, grey-brown, with gummy resin-filled blisters when young, the bark beco…

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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 21 October 2019
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Western Hemlock (Tsugo heterophyllo)

WESTERN HEMLOCK (Tsugo heterophyllo)

A large tree, it usually grows 30 to 50 metres tall. It has a rather narrow crown and conspicuously drooping new growth at the top of the tree. It has mostly down-sweeping branches and delicate feathery foliage.

LEAVES

Needles are nearly flat, glossy, and soft; yellow to dark green on the upper surface and whitish underneath. The needles are unequal in length and produce feathery, flat sprays. Where to find western hemlock It grows along both the east and west sides of the Coast Ranges, from sea level to mid elevations, as well as in the Interior wet belt west of the Rocky Mountains.

CONES

The small, numerous seed cones are greenish to reddish-purple and turn brown with age.

BARK

Dark brown to reddish-brown, b…

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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 21 October 2019
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Grand Fir (Abies grandis)

GRAND FIR (Abies grandis)

A tall, stately tree that can grow up to 80 metres when maulre.

LEAVES

Needles are flat with rounded and notched ends. They are dark green and grooved on top with two white bands underneath. Needles are arranged to form flat sprays that show both the upper and lower surfaces of the twig.


CONES

Seed cones are barrel-shaped and yellowish-green, growing upright on the branches, high in the crown. The cones shed the scales with the seeds dUring autumn.

BARK

The bark is smooth and greyishbrown with white spots and blisters filled with gummy resin when young. The bark becomes furrowed and scaly with age.

GRAND FIR ON THE MAP OF B.C

It is found from sea level to mid elevations along the southern coast and around the Kootenay and …


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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 21 October 2019
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Sitka Spruce (Picea sitchensis)

SITKA SPRUCE (Picea sitchensis)

A large coniferous tree that commonly grows up to 70 metres tall and 2 metres across when mature. The largest known Sitka spmce is 93 metres tall and 5 metres across.

LEAVES

Needles are light green to bluish-green, stiff, and sharp. They are four-sided but slightly flattened with two white bands mnning along the upper surface and two narrower bands along the lower surface. The needles are arranged spirally along the twig and are attached by small pegs which remain on the twig after the needles fall.

CONES

Seed cones are reddish- to yellowish-brown and hang from the crown. Their seed scales are thin, wavy, and irregularly toothed. Pollen cones are red.

BARK

The bark is very thin, brown or purplish grey, and breaks u…

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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 21 October 2019
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Tamarack (Larix laricina)

TAMARACK (Larix laricina)

A small, slender tree which rarely grows more than 15 metres tall. It has delicate, deciduous foliage.

LEAVES

Needles are three-sided and blue-green, turning bright yellow in autumn. They grow in clusters of 15 to 25 on short woody projections which remain on the twig after the needles fall.

CONES

The small, round seed cones are red at flowering and turn brown with age. Pollen cones are yellow.

BARK

Red-brown, thin, and scaly.

TAMARACK ON THE MAP OF B.C

It is a northern species which grows mainly east of the Rockies and in a few isolated groups of trees in the Nechako Valley.

HABITAT

Tamarack is usually found with black spruce on poorly drained soils - bogs and swamps - and on cool, moist, northfacing slopes.

USES

Some native g…

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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 21 October 2019
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Western Larch (Larix accidentalis)

WESTERN LARCH (Larix accidentalis)

Like all larches, it loses its needles in the autumn. This large, handsome coniferous tree can grow to 80 metres tall and 850 years of age.

LEAVES

New needles are soft green, turning golden yellow in the fall, and broadly triangular in cross section. They are long, clustered in bunches of 15 to 30 on stubby, woody projections which remain on the twig after the needles fall.

CONES

Seed cones are elongated and red to reddish-brown. The scales have white hairs on the lower surface and prominent, long slender bracts. Pollen cones are yellow.

BARK

Mature trees develop thick, grooved plate-like bark with cinnamon-coloured scales (similar to ponderosa pine bark).

WESTERN LARCH ON THE MAP OF B.C

It grows in valleys and on t…

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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 21 October 2019
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Ponderosa/Yellow Pine (Pinus ponderosa)

PONDEROSA/YELLOW PINE (Pinus ponderosa)

A large-crowned coniferous tree with a straight trunk, usually about 25 to 30 metres tall, but sometimes reaching a height of 50 metres and a diameter of 2 metres.

LEAVES

Needles occur in bunches of three (occasionally both twos and threes), 12 to 28 centimetres long, slender, with sharp points and sharply toothed edges.

CONES

Seed cones are narrowly oval when closed, 7 to 14 centimetres long, with no stalk. The scales get thicker towards the tip and have a sharp, rigid prickle. Seeds have a 2.5 centimetre wing.

BARK

Blackish, rough, and scaly on young trees; on mature trees the bark is very thick (up to 10 centimetres), bright orang'ey-brown, and deeply grooved into flat, flaky plates.

Where to find ponderos…

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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 21 October 2019
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Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta)

LODGEPOLE PINE (Pinus contorta)

A tall, slender, coniferous tree which grows throughout most of the Interior.

LEAVES

Needles occur in bunches of two and are often twisted in a spiral with sharp points; usually dark green.

CONES

Seed cones vary in shape from short and cylindrical to egg-shaped; 2 to 4 centimetres long without stalks. The seed scales have sharp prickles at their tips.

BARK

The bark is thin, orangey-brown to grey, and finely scaled.

LODGEPOLE PINE ON THE MAP OF B.C

It grows throughout the Interior, from mid elevation to subalpine sites.

HABITAT

Lodgepole pine is a highly adaptable tree that can grow in all sorts of environments, from water-logged bogs to dry sandy soils. Lodgepole pine is one of the fIrst trees to invade after a wildfIre.…

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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 21 October 2019
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Yellow Cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis)

YELLOW CEDAR (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis)

A medium-sized tree, up to 24 metres tall and 90 centimetres in diameter; has a broad, grooved trunk that spreads out widely at the base. The crown is sharply cone-shaped, with branches that spread out and droop, and have small, loosely hanging branchlets.

LEAVES

Scale-like, dark, bluish-green, and slender with sharp points. Unlike the western red cedar, the leaves of the yellow-cedar are all alike, so that the leaf-covered twigs appear four-sided rather than flat.

CONES

Cones are round, 6 to 12 millimetres in diameter, berry-like in the fIrst year and becoming woody as they mature. Mature cones have 4 to 6 thick umbrella-shaped scales.

BARK

On young trees, the bark is thin, greyish-brown and scaly; on ma…

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Epiphlyte Epiphlyte 21 October 2019
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Western Red Cedar (Thuja plicata)

WESTERN RED CEDAR (Thuja plicata)

A large coniferous tree, up to 60 metres tall when mature, with drooping branches - the trunk is often spread out widely at the base.

LEAVES

Scale-like, with opposite pairs, in four rows, folded in one pair but not in the other and overlapping like shingles. Arranged on the twigs in flat, fan-like sprays. Very strong, sharp, pine-like aroma.

CONES

Seed cones are egg-shaped, about 1 centimetre long, with several pairs of scales. Pollen cones are small and reddish, slightly chalky.

BARK

Reddish-gray and stringy, tearing off in long strips on mature trees. The inner bark gets lighter and lighter until it get to the heartwood, which is reddish-orange.

WESTERN RED CEDAR ON THE MAP OF B.C

It typically occurs at low to mid…

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Dser Dser 21 July 2010
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Medals System

As the creator of the medals, Dser has the authority to place the image on his blog if he hasn't earned it yet, but not eligible to place them on his userpage if he hasn't earned them.

The Medals System was finally created as of July 20, 2010.


  • 1 Article medals
  • 2 Upload medals
  • 3 Cancelled new medal
  • 4 Userbox medals
  • 5 Language medals

To obtain an article medal, a user must have contributed a certain amount of times.

Red= 10 contributions
Green= 20 contributions
Bronze= 40 contributions
Silver=80 contributions
Gold=300 contributions


To obtain an upload medal, a user must have uploaded a certain amount of images or sound files.

Red= 5 uploads
Green= 10 uploads
Bronze=20 uploads
Silver= 40 uploads
Gold= 100 uploads


The new medals were going to be made, but were cancel…













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Dser Dser 2 July 2010
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Featured 2010

Since Plantspedia was created during the middle of 2010, there will be less featured things during this year. The reason for this blog is to show improvement over the wiki, and reports for featured article and featured images.


  • 1 June 2010
    • 1.1 Featured article
    • 1.2 Featured image
  • 2 July 2010
    • 2.1 Featured article
    • 2.2 Featured image
  • 3 August 2010
    • 3.1 Featured article
    • 3.2 Featured image
  • 4 September
    • 4.1 Featured article
    • 4.2 Featured image
  • 5 October
    • 5.1 Featured article
    • 5.2 Featured image
  • 6 November
    • 6.1 Featured article
    • 6.2 Featured image


For the month of June 2010, Prunus × yedoensis defeated Diospyros quaesita, two votes to nothing. The only problem with P. × yedoensis winning, was that nobody posted their reasons why they wanted the article featured on the talk page. I hope that some…




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